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Opinion : The Irony of Fighting Corruption in Uganda: A Culture of Excuses and Denial

 

By Hason Mutunzi Bwambale

 

The recent arrest of Members of Parliament (MPs) over corruption charges has once again exposed the hypocrisy and double standards that undermine our nation’s fight against corruption. While no statements have been made by cultural and religious leaders, supporters, or mobilizers, history suggests that they will soon rally behind the accused, pleading for forgiveness without due process. This predictable pattern perpetuates a culture of impunity and undermines the rule of law.

 

Corruption is a cancer that has ravaged our nation, perpetuating poverty, inequality, and suffering. It’s astonishing how quickly the narrative shifts from condemning graft to defending the corrupt. We’ve witnessed this scenario play out repeatedly: leaders publicly denounce corruption, only to become advocates for leniency when one of their own is caught. This selective outrage and double standard only serve to perpetuate corruption.

 

The arrest of MPs is a rare victory in the fight against corruption. However, the real test lies in ensuring that justice is served, and that these individuals are held accountable for their actions. We must recognize that corruption is a crime against the nation, not just an individual transgression. It’s time to stop treating corrupt officials like victims and start holding them accountable.

 

The courts must be allowed to do their job without intimidation or pressure from vested interests. We need a new era of accountability and transparency, where corruption is met with consequences, not excuses. Anything less will only perpetuate the cycle of corruption and impunity that has plagued our nation for far too long.

 

The consequences of corruption are far-reaching, affecting every aspect of our society. It’s time to acknowledge the harm caused by corruption and demand justice for the victims. We need a national consensus that corruption is unacceptable and will no longer be tolerated.

 

Furthermore, we need to address the root causes of corruption, including the lack of transparency and accountability in government institutions. We need stronger institutions, robust laws, and effective enforcement mechanisms to prevent corruption and ensure accountability.

 

In conclusion, the fight against corruption requires a collective effort and a commitment to justice, accountability, and transparency. We must reject the culture of excuses and denial and embrace a culture of accountability and justice. Only then can we build a Uganda that truly values integrity and justice for all.

 

The writer is the Executive Director of Cente Media Group,one of Uganda’s online media outlets.

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